K-5 Student Progress Report to be Refined – Parent Survey Results Shared

Following a year of use of a K-5 student Progress Report that is generated through Infinite Campus, our student information software program, the Progress Report will be undergoing some revisions.

On June 10, 2011, the Assistant Superintendent led the K-5 Grade Level leaders in a review of the Parent Progress Report Survey result. From the results of this meeting came many recommendations that will be followed up on by K-5 Principals, K-5 Grade Level leaders and the Assistant Superintendent. The intent of this follow up is to improve the progress reporting tool, with the number one goal of having a report that is meaningful to students and parents for the 2011-2012 school year.

2010-2011 saw a report that was new to students, parents, and staff alike. It was created so that all student reporting, K-12, could be done through Infinite Campus. Eventually, all student progress reports will be available online and viewable from a secure web connection.

Refinements to the K-5 Progress Report were suggested shortly after the first Trimester, in December 2010. Both Superintendent, Suzanne Godin, and Assistant Superintendent, Steven Bailey, attended meetings with parents where feedback was provided regarding “likes and dislikes” of the new reporting system.

In April and May 2011, following the second trimester, a Parent Progress Report Survey was created and made available to all K-5 parents, either in paper form or through the SPSD website. 185 surveys representing 230 students from all five schools and all six grades were completed. Highlights of the results are as follows:
• The greatest replies were “somewhat” and “a great deal” when asked “if the amount of detail in the Progress Report helps you know your child is making progress.”
• The greatest response (nearly half) was “most of it” when asked to respond to “I like the amount of information on the Progress Report.” About one-quarter of the replies were “not at all” and one-quarter were “a little”.
• When asked if your child understands and can explain the progress report, more than half of the replies were “no”.
• There were many comments returned, with wide variation…however, many with a common theme: Students have a difficult time making sense of the new Progress Report, and Parents prefer less educational jargon and would like more teacher comments that help personalize the Progress Reports for their child.

As stated above, refinements to the K-5 Progress Report are expected for use within the 2011-2012 school year.